What's on your horizon? Is it time to explore?

What's on your horizon? Is it time to explore?

It is a well-known fact that an able and intelligent human in possession of singular ambition must be in want of progress.

Hear! Hear! And yet, when it comes to the mechanics of seeking progress, said able and intelligent human tends to retreat to the distracting halls of day to day minutiae and the comfortable gathering spaces of known social circles.

In short, the familiar eats the unknown for breakfast.

What Are You Celebrating?

What Are You Celebrating?

In my Leader’s Edge Mastermind group, and in my weekly team meeting, I always ask, ‘What are you celebrating this week?’ As Boundless Leaders, we are constantly stretching towards new horizons, and it’s important to acknowledge how far we’ve come. It’s the key to building a strong centre that allows the ongoing exploration into the unknown.

Invariably it is a bit of a struggle to find something ‘noteworthy’ to list on the celebrations ledger. We are so locked in to the idea that celebration needs a significant achievement to warrant notice. And so we drag ourselves from week to week, without stopping to take a breath. It’s only when we reach a target that we might experience a passing moment of euphoria, then it’s back to the grindstone.

I think we can do celebration better.

Be Better: How to Break the Blocks In Your Leadership

Be Better: How to Break the Blocks In Your Leadership

Boundless Leadership is when we know everything is possible, and we have a deep and strong centre that allows us to explore the edges of what is possible. I’m interested in what blocks our progress in boundless leadership. What stops us from developing a strong centre, and what keeps us from moving past the edges.

In a survey to my tribe, I asked, “What are your biggest challenges at work?”

Here are the top 3 answers:

Stop ruining your life with obligation!

Stop ruining your life with obligation!

“What percentage of your life is currently your own?”

This is one of the questions I ask clients when we first start working together. The majority answer less than 100%. The sense of obligation is rife.

It got me thinking about what holds us back. Obligations are one of the big anchors we drag along behind us. They drain energy and vitality. They are one of the biggest risks to Boundless Leadership.

Boundless Leadership is stepping boldly in to the unknown where everything is possible. Limitations are dissolved, and our energy is abundant with enthusiasm, and industry.

Obligation clogs up the petrol of our passion.

When your current ability falls short

When your current ability falls short

“Oh crap!” These were the words that spun through my head as I flipped over my skis, landing upside down, smacking my head. It hurt.

We had 1.5 meters (5 feet) of snow in a week. This is highly unusual, and in 20 years of skiing in the Australian Alps, I have not seen the like!

I also had more falls this week than I have had in the last five years. It was a combination of heavy snowfall, poor visibility, and funky, sticky snow.

I hadn’t skied this kind of snow before and I felt like a learner all over again.

New conditions need new ability.

Mind Your Mojo: Essential Strategy for Boundless Leaders

Mind Your Mojo: Essential Strategy for Boundless Leaders

I’ve been thinking about this idea of exploring the edge of experience. Growth is trying new things, exploring aspects of yourself as yet unknown, striving for new levels of performance and results not yet achieved.

Adventure in to the unknown requires deep commitment, profound courage, and a centered core. And you can’t do that without a full tank of mojo!

 

Centered Leadership In A Time Of Hate

Centered Leadership In A Time Of Hate

Grief stained my heart. Every day this week stories of hatred, murder, violence leapt from the media. White supremacy violence in Charlottesville, a President who all but excused it, Pauline Hanson and her hate-filled vitriol against Muslims, and yet another bus attack against civilians, this time in Spain.

What are we doing to each other?

Behaviour problems in the workplace - what's really the cause

Behaviour problems in the workplace - what's really the cause

With all the fresh snow from the ‘Blizzard of Oz’, it seemed every man and their dog was out on the slopes, taking advantage of the extraordinary conditions. This meant long queues for the lifts. If you’ve never skied at a resort before, imagine this: it’s like sheep being squeezed through little channels to funnel towards a shearing shed. At the ski lifts, the action point is where people line up to get on the chair or tow-bar. There is a sheep-dip like turnstile that reads your pass electronically, before you shuffle forward towards the chair. For a four-person lift, there are four turnstiles, the idea being that you go through in a line, all ready for the chair.

Sounds good in theory. In practice, mayhem.

From mutiny to loyalty: a leader's guide

From mutiny to loyalty: a leader's guide

I think it's every leader’s dream that staff show up excited to be at work, play hard all day, produce amazing results, and pledge undying loyalty to the company. Then reality hits.

Leaders get disillusioned when staff don't seem to care as much as they do. They don't put in as many hours or see the bigger picture like they do. Then the complaints start: Staff have a sense of entitlement! They're not performing at the right level! They’re not the right fit!

Some of this may be true.

And yet, blaming the symptom won't fix the cause.